Best resize practices


#1

Hi,

I’m wondering what the best way is to resize images? E.g. if I have an image that is 1980 x 1020px. And I would like it to end up around 4 times bigger, let’s says to a size of 7920 x 4080 px

Should I resize the original image with the intelligent resize tool before applying the Art Effects, or should I apply the Art Effects first and afterwards resize the new image with the resize tool?

I’ve tried playing around with it in multiple combinations but somehow I always end up with a print-ready file that it’s 3000px big.

On a side note, what is the exact difference between a normal file and a print-ready file?


#2

I use Corel PaintShop Pro for editing images. One of its advantages is PaintShop Pro has an artificial intelligence resize function. As the name implies it uses artificial intelligence to upscale or downscale an image.

I found it best to go in baby steps when up-scaling, because the results are better doing so, than using one step. What I mean is, you can directly go to 400% (7920 X 4080), or for better results, use 150% in 4 separate increments. The latter resulting in a much smoother appearance of the image or painting.


#3


Para imprimir las pinturas se requiere 300 DPI
Con lo que ocupa gran cantidad de memoria y megabyte -
El cambio de tamaño que lo logra con Corel Paint lo puede hacer tb en resolución 300 DPI ?
Ex


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#4

Thanks for the reply. Is that also the reason you don’t use the in build AI resize in Deep Art Effects?


#5

I am more familiar with PaintShop Pro (PSP) since I have used PSP for more than two decades and know its capabilities. I use Deep Art Effects (DAE) for the variety of artistic results, then import them into PSP as layers so I can better manipulate specific aspects to my artistic needs. Layering is similar to what one gets in DAE and PSP gives the ability to fine tone the DAE results. It’s more of a personal preference.


#6

That does make sense. :slight_smile:

Do you happen to know the difference between saving a file normally and saving it as a print-ready file?


#7

The print ready file save is intended for lower quality images, it makes sure it the file is at least 3000px.
If you are already working with a larger canvas, save it normally


#8

Thanks for the follow up. That explains a lot! Regarding my original question about the resizing, are there any best practices for resizing?

And lastly. I noticed png’s can get get extremely large after resizing. Is there any benefit in using png’s over jpg’s if transparency isn’t needed?


#9

About JPG vs PNG here’s are a couple of good articles:


#10

Thanks Hutch!

For future reference. I also found this article https://www.printsgicleeshop.com/consider-png-versus-jpg-for-a-ready-to-print-file/ dealing specifically with image sizes and printing. It recommends png’s for that.